Minnesota State Standards for K-12 Teachers: Spreadsheets for All Grades and Content Areas

Minnesota MN State Standards for K-12 Teachers: Spreadsheets for All Grades and Content Areas
This post includes three sets of standards spreadsheets to support teachers in moving towards a more standards-based education system. The spreadsheets can be used to track the intended, implemented and attained curriculum. 

Official information about the Minnesota State Standards for K-12 teachers is available on the Academic Standards (K-12) page of the Minnesota Department of Education Website. Be sure to visit the MDE website for the most up-to-date information on the standards revision process. You can also download the Minnesota Academic Standards App for free directly from Google Play or Apple.


What are the intended, implemented and attained curriculum? 


The following quote from Leading a High Reliability School provides a helpful summary of the intended, implemented and attained curriculum. 


“In the era of standards and accountability, school leaders should think about curriculum for any content using three interrelated curriculum types. The first is the intended curriculum , which national, state, and district standards determine. The second, the implemented curriculum, actually gets taught in classrooms. Students actually learn the third type, the attained curriculum, in each grade level or course. Ideally, these three curricula align so the intended curriculum is the implemented curriculum and the implemented curriculum is the attained curriculum.”  -- from Leading a High Reliability School by Marzano, Warrick, Rains and DuFour (2018, p. 108)


Overview of the Three Curriculum Types


The following sections provides a brief overview of each of the three curriculum types.


  • Intended Curriculum - The intended curriculum is the curriculum that should be taught. It is determined by state standards and district priorities. 


  • Implemented Curriculum - The implemented curriculum is what actually gets taught by teachers in the classroom. 


  • Attained Curriculum - The attained curriculum is what students have learned or mastered. In a standards-based education system, specific success criteria are used to evaluate mastery of each standard and benchmark.


Intended Curriculum


The intended curriculum is the curriculum that should be taught


The intended curriculum for public schools in Minnesota are the Minnesota State Standards, available at Academic Standards K-12. In order to ensure a guaranteed and viable curriculum, especially during times of distance and hybrid learning, districts may invest time and resources in prioritizing these standards. 


Prioritizing standards does not mean that districts are exempt from covering the required Minnesota State Standards. Rather, the process of prioritization can highlight which standards should receive the most instructional time. Teachers should ensure that all students master the prioritized standards through frequent assessment with remediation and enrichment as needed.


There are multiple strategies that schools can use to prioritize standards. One of the most popular strategies is the R.E.A.L criteria developed by Larry Ainsworth. This criteria asks teachers to consider Readiness, Endurance, Assessment and Leverage for each standard.


The spreadsheets linked below include all of the Minnesota State Standards organized by grade level for elementary and middle school and by content area for high school. For each standard, teachers are able to indicate whether or not each standard meets the criteria listed. The total number of criteria are summed together to provide a visual overview of which standards should be prioritized. 


The work of prioritizing standards should not be completed in isolation. Teachers should work in grade level or department teams to ensure consistency across the school and district. Teachers without job-alike peers may need to collaborate more flexibly with colleagues. To access the complete standards sets, visit the links below.


Intended Curriculum - Use these sheets to prioritize the standards. 



Variations: 


  • Grade and Content Configurations - The particular grade and content configurations may need to be adjusted depending on local arrangements within the school. 

  • Teacher Judgement - The spreadsheets linked above include teacher judgement as another criterion for evaluation. This can provide teachers with an opportunity to share their own expertise regarding the standards, but this criterion could be removed if it seems to be redundant with the other categories. 

  • Instruction and Assessment - Another way to make this documentation more robust would be to ask teachers to document which instructional and assessment practices they use to evaluate mastery of each standard. Two final columns have been added to give teachers a potential place to record this information. 


Implemented Curriculum


The implemented curriculum is the curriculum that was actually taught. Ideally, as Marzano et al (2018) write, the implemented curriculum would be directly aligned with the intended curriculum. 


Teachers should have a clear understanding of which standards are being addressed by the activities and assessments within the classroom. To access the set of spreadsheets for tracking the implemented curriculum, visit the links below.


Implemented Curriculum - Use these sheets to track which standards have been taught


 

Variations: 


  • Grade and Content Configurations - As with the intended curriculum, the particular grade and content configurations may need to be adjusted depending on local arrangements within the school. 

  • Time Frames - While the current spreadsheets are set up to track standards on a weekly time frame, you may consider another organizational schematic for tracking which standards were actually taught. Instead of weekly, this tracking could be daily, by quarter or by unit. In addition, you could consider tracking standards based on particular assessments, such as benchmark or summative assessments. 


Attained Curriculum


The attained curriculum is the curriculum that was learned. It is important to have a clear understanding of the difference between teaching and learning. Just because a standard was taught, does not mean that it was actually learned. 


It may be that the timing, methods, or duration of instruction was not well-suited to deep learning. Because of this, it is important for teachers to develop a range of effective assessment strategies that can be used to evaluate student learning, both for formative and summative purposes. 


To access the complete set of spreadsheets for tracking the attained curriculum, visit the links below.


Attained Curriculum - Use these sheets to record which standards have been learned



Variations: 


  • Grade and Content Configurations - As with the intended and implemented curriculum, the particular grade and content configurations may need to be adjusted depending on local arrangements within the school. 

  • Proficiency Scale - Depending on the local context, various proficiency scales may be used to report student learning. A common proficiency scale used with standards-based grading evaluates students from 1 to 4.

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