Thursday, August 31, 2017

Reflections from a Refugee Camp - Part B


When I think back on the past month, it is hard for me to put into words exactly what the experience of teaching in a refugee camp has meant for me. There is so much I have learned and so many memories I will be taking with me. I have learned a great deal more about human capacity, the impact of collaboration and the power of dreams. Some memories of my time in Lebanon fill me with immense joy, while others bring an almost immeasurable sadness. I am grateful to the staff and other volunteers at Jusoor who provided support and encouragement throughout my time there.

Jusoor Summer Education Program 2017
The Lebanese and Syrians I met over the last month have taught me so much about human resiliency, courage and capacity. The capacity to learn and grow is evident in schools and camps all over Lebanon. There is a curiosity for learning that shows up through many lenses and in many ways. The heartbreaking truth of refugee camps, though, is that in spite of individual courage and commitment, the dehumanizing process of displacement can strip away much-needed opportunities for growth. The longer we let millions of people languish in refugee camps, the more we lose out on a collective of wisdom and capital that cannot be replaced. 
The work I was able to do was only made possible because a group of like-minded individuals came together with a desire to do more for the children of Syria. We could talk in circles about the need for better policies, infrastructures and systems solutions, but at the end of the day, information and intention alone cannot affect change. Only actions can do that. And the team at Jusoor has worked tirelessly to build a much-needed foundation of support and action for refugee youth, one that can serve to be scaled and replicated across Lebanon. This experience has reminded me of just how powerful collaboration can be when people come together to share their time, energy and expertise. 

Student Dreams
Finally, my students taught me every day about the power of dreams. As part of one of our peacebuilding activities, my students worked collectively to create a tree of dreams. Each student received a leaf and drew a picture of a dream or goal on their leaf. Then, one-by-one, they shared their dream with the class and we pasted it onto our tree of dreams. Although there was a language barrier between my students and me, it was incredible to see the way in which their eyes lighted up and their smiles widened. Some students dreamt of being lions or butterflies. Other had dreams of being teachers or doctors. One girl dreamed of a day when she could once again sit in a garden next to her home. For the children of Syria, I wish all this and so much more.

Jusoor students working on a puzzle

Much more needs to be done internationally to ensure that students’ right to education is realized around the world. The children of this world have incredible dreams, and I believe we have the resources to accomplish these dreams if we can commit to acting together. If you have questions or want to know more about getting involved with refugee and emergency education, please let me know. You can read more about Jusoor’s work here.

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